Teaching Tuesday: 4 Tips to Help You Remember

Learn how to beat the daily distractions and have a better memory

From the New York Times, “Smarter Living” comes the variety of ways we’re distracted daily and how it affects our memory. Learn 4 tips for improving your ability to remember.

Click here for the article

Check out our hundreds of memory prompts, listed by category. Great for general recall of the past–especially if you’re writing your memoir.

 

Funny Friday: Your 20-Year-Old Body

 Funny, Infuriating, or True?

 

 

Doc says to the patient, “You have the body of a twenty-year-old, but you should return it. You’re stretching it completely out of shape.”

 

Teaching Tuesday: Write Your Obit in Your Lifetime

How many of you read the obits first thing?

Fascination with obits is actually a good thing. We accept the reality of death and compensate the loss by finding some hidden meaning or benefit. Reading obits is a positive strategy for dealing with loss.

Photos from Legacy.com

Now, how about writing your obit–while you’re still here on this planet?   The 7 Benefits:

It shows your love and provides a opportunity for closeness … and eventually closure. It allows a safe place for offering information you may not have been willing to share previously. It can foster the healing of old wounds, thus forging a path to forgiveness. And it can lead to your reuniting with former family and friends through e-mail and social media.

Leads to a better understanding of yourself. You gain deeper insight of your significant life events. It offers a place to express your uniqueness that leads to self-awareness and self-acceptance. You look inward and contemplate who you truly are as a human being.

Leads to a greater realization of your personal power. Dealing with this sensitive issue shows great strength. It’s holding up a mirror to your life—and showing that it counts, warts and all.

Offers a message to future generations and teaches positive values. Your strength and resilience is a model for others to follow.

Sparks curiosity about you among your family and friends. It may motivate others to research details or to start journaling, or even to write their own obituaries.

Teaches new skills. Specifically, how to organize and write your thoughts–and how to inform others.

Offers your own words about your personal story and how you want to be remembered … and YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY WILL THANK YOU!

Rabbi Harold Kushner writes, “I am convinced that it is not the fear of death, of our lives ending that haunts our sleep so much, as the fear… that as far as the world is concerned, we might as well never have lived.”

Every passing life leaves something beautiful behind.

Teaching Tuesday: Write Your Obit in Your Lifetime

How many of you read the obits first thing?

Fascination with obits is actually a good thing. We accept the reality of death and compensate the loss by finding some hidden meaning or benefit. Reading obits is a positive strategy for dealing with loss.

Photos from Legacy.com

Now, how about writing your obit–while you’re still here on this planet?   The 7 Benefits:

It shows your love and provides a opportunity for closeness … and eventually closure. It allows a safe place for offering information you may not have been willing to share previously. It can foster the healing of old wounds, thus forging a path to forgiveness. And it can lead to your reuniting with former family and friends through e-mail and social media.

Leads to a better understanding of yourself. You gain deeper insight of your significant life events. It offers a place to express your uniqueness that leads to self-awareness and self-acceptance. You look inward and contemplate who you truly are as a human being.

Leads to a greater realization of your personal power. Dealing with this sensitive issue shows great strength. It’s holding up a mirror to your life—and showing that it counts, warts and all.

Offers a message to future generations and teaches positive values. Your strength and resilience is a model for others to follow.

Sparks curiosity about you among your family and friends. It may motivate others to research details or to start journaling, or even to write their own obituaries.

Teaches new skills. Specifically, how to organize and write your thoughts–and how to inform others.

Offers your own words about your personal story and how you want to be remembered … and YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY WILL THANK YOU!

Rabbi Harold Kushner writes, “I am convinced that it is not the fear of death, of our lives ending that haunts our sleep so much, as the fear… that as far as the world is concerned, we might as well never have lived.”

Every passing life leaves something beautiful behind.

Teaching Tuesday: Memoir Partnering Using Reminiscence Therapy (Part 1)

“Memoir Partnering brings me back to the world. It’s fun to talk about my life and realize the blessings I have.”

These are the words of 97-year-old BJ, who reminisced about her photos and her life and now enjoys the resulting memoir. Her memoir was written using 7 Memories: Partnering to Write a Memoir, that puts Reminiscence Therapy in the hands of family, friends, and volunteers who want to capture memories of those whose recall is fading.

Reminiscence Therapy is the use of life histories to improve psychological well-being, as defined by the American Psychological Association. The original idea is credited to Erik Erikson who included it as part of his eight stages of psychosocial development from birth to death. In late adulthood, the last stage, he posited that it becomes important for us to look back on our lives with satisfaction before we die. In 1963, Dr. Robert Butler formalized the idea and coined the term “Reminiscence Therapy.”

Since the 1960s, numerous studies with older adults, show that Reminiscence Therapy improves cognitive function, quality of life, and emotional well-being. It provides older adults with a sense of overall life satisfaction and coping skills, and may also help to ameliorate the symptoms of depression and dementia.

Rather than approach reminiscence as therapy, 7Memories.com approaches it as intentional storytelling from one person to another, resulting in a written memoir. 7 Memories: Partnering to Write a Memoir offers the Memoir Partner (MP) a specific method for using photos and memorabilia to evoke memories in the older person, termed the Extraordinary Person (EP). When the EP recalls the life-shaping challenges s/he has overcome, self-esteem, coping skills, memory, and mental agility improve. The EP reflects on life and how s/he wants to be remembered—and leaves a message. The memoir is information passed from one generation to another—and a physical manifestation of a life that will not be forgotten.

The purpose of 7 Memories: Partnering to Write a Memoir, is to provide a complete guide—how to use Reminiscence Therapy to turn memories into memoirs. It provides everything the MP needs to start and finish the memoir—from the introduction, reflective listening, templates, and memory prompts to optional “homework” for EPs who can work independently after each session to reinforce memories. Based on personal photos and memorabilia, it can include all sensory modalities, visual, auditory, gustatory/olfactory, and tactile. The method can be adapted to specific individual skill levels and used in small groups.

7 Memories: Partnering to Write a Memoir is available at Amazon.

Funny Friday: Women vs. Men

 Funny, Infuriating, or True?

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Few women admit their age; few men act it.